Tag Archives: passwords

Managing passwords using GnuPG, Git and Emacs

Like any other security conscious and/or slightly paranoid computer geek I have lots and lots of unique and nontrivial passwords to keep track of.  My solution to this problem involves having one GnuPG encrypted text file per username/password pair.

andreas@stilgar:~/safe$ gpg < example.gpg

You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
user: "Andreas Olsson <andreas@arrakis.se>"
4096-bit RSA key, ID 9A943D4A, created 2010-07-11 (main key ID 13CD4F59)
  Here gnupg-agent calls pinentry-gtk2 to prompt me for the passphrase
gpg: encrypted with 4096-bit RSA key, ID 9A943D4A, created 2010-07-11
      "Andreas Olsson <andreas@arrakis.se>"

https://127.0.0.1/

username: sigge
password: sigge

andreas@stilgar:~/safe$

As I need to have access to those passwords on more than one computer I use Git, and a remote repository, to keep my encrypted files in sync. Other options might be to mount a SFTP folder using SSHFS, or to simply put the files in your Dropbox. Yet, if you too decide to go with Git, here is a .gitignore you might want to use.

andreas@stilgar:~/safe$ cat .gitignore
*
!*.gpg
!.gitignore
andreas@stilgar:~/safe$

Thanks to Emacs and EasyPG it is a breeze to  create new GnuPG encrypted text files, as well as to modify existing ones. Just use the file extension .gpg, and EasyPG will do its thing. The first time, when you actually create the file, you will be prompted for which public keys you want to encrypt against.

andreas@stilgar:~/safe$ emacs yet_another_example.gpg

(EasyPG is included in Emacs 23, and don’t need to be installed separately.)

Do note that this method also works when there are multiple people involved. Just make sure that the intended users have access to the share/repository in question, and that their public keys are included when you create the GnuPG files.